EU litigation with Poland: no compromises, please



comment

Status: 10/22/2021 6:52 p.m.

European law is the glue of the EU. The other states must not allow the Polish government to no longer recognize this. If you want to be a member of the club, you have to follow the rules.

A comment by Helga Schmidt, ARD-Studio Brussels

The European Union does not have its own government, it does not have a king or a federal president. And not even a common language that connects the 27 member countries. The only thing that holds the Union together, from Finland to Italy and from Portugal to Lithuania, is the common conception of law. European law is the glue of the EU, law holds the store together.

Helga Schmidt
ARD studio Brussels

Regardless of all differences of opinion and cultural differences, every EU citizen must be able to rely on the fact that he will meet independent judges in court who can make decisions free of political pressure. That he can get information from the free media that does not speak to the government and, most importantly, that the billions in funding from the EU budget end up where they belong.

Funds could no longer flow

The countries of Eastern Europe joined the EU in 2004 because of these rights and values. The rest of the EU cannot allow the fact that the Polish government of all people no longer wants to recognize parts of this EU law and is referring to an ordered judgment pronounced by a questionable and politically composed court in Poland. There is now no point in looking for compromises and meeting somewhere in the middle.

When it comes to the validity of the law, there can be no compromise. The law must apply – for every member. Many heads of state and government openly stated this at the summit. That is progress. If you want to be a member of the club, you have to follow the rules. And if you don’t do that, you have to expect that the money from Brussels will no longer flow as usual.

Rely on fundamental rights

The Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki calls this blackmail. But his opposition at home calls it consistent. The Polish judges who are put under pressure by the government, the homosexuals who are hunted, the journalists who cannot report freely: they must all be able to rely on the fact that European fundamental rights also apply to them – regardless of the question who is currently ruling in Warsaw.

Editorial note

Comments generally reflect the opinion of the respective author and not that of the editors.

EU litigation with Poland: no compromises, please

Helga Schmidt, ARD Brussels, 10/22/2021 6:45 p.m.


www.tagesschau.de

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *